Category Archives: Participatory research methods

Don’t do it unless you have to?

We know that multi-agency partnership working is difficult. “Collaboration is by nature inefficient.  It is only sensible to collaborate if real collaborative advantage can be envisaged.  The strongest piece of advice, therefore, is ‘don’t do it unless you have to’”.  … Continue reading

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How to create an appetite for evidence……

I’m just back from a very interesting gathering of folk who find evidence use fascinating and want to see more of it.    We at least seemed to agree that we want to create more of an appetite for evidence and want … Continue reading

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How action research can help to deliver better services

See this short creative storyboard – with thanks to IRISS for their support How action research can help to deliver better services from iriss on Vimeo.

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We need more experimentation….

This is well worth a look……The Public Petitions Committee of the Scottish Parliament   An important call for us all to talk about our assumptions, share our thinking and adopt a more experimental approach to the design and delivery of public services.   … Continue reading

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When are you ever not piloting?

See this new page with a short article about the important debate about redefining the relationship between public services and communities and the role of research and evidence.  It would be great to hear your responses.

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Seldom heard voices

This set of stories came from the recent evaluation of the Cedar work. They are composite stories based on themes from across different data sources.  They’re told by young people and mothers who’d been in Cedar groups and the staff that … Continue reading

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Research as if people were human

 Here’s a link to an important new book by Yoland Wadsworth “Building in research and evaluation – human inquiry for living systems“, 2011

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New skills we need…listening, unlearning, reflexivity…..

Professor Robert Chambers was interviewed about his career in international development.  It’s refreshing to hear his reflections, especially about unlearning and reflexivity….. Robert Chambers interview

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Insights from stories

Research for Real is eight years old this month!  It’s been an exciting time and it’s hard to believe the variety of work that we’ve been involved in.  At the moment we’re busy preparing for an Exchange Event for the … Continue reading

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